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Sowing
  • Choose a sunny position with as little shade as possible.
  • Prepare your ground over the winter time with well rotten farmyard manure and allow this to break down over the winter period.  
  • If you haven’t access to farmyard manure all our CountryLife branches stock poultry manure which is an ideal substitute.
  • Plant during the spring time, sow directly into soil, 4 inches apart.
  • Push the bulb until covered with soil.
  • Keep the tip of the bulb facing upwards.
  • Onions can be prone to various fungus-borne diseases which makes it worthwhile to rotate the position of your onions each year.
Growing
  • Keep the onion sets free from weeds through out the summer by regular hoeing.
  • If dry spells of weather occur ensure to keep the onions well watered.
  • Feed the onion sets every two weeks with a liquid feed, such as Organic Tomato Food available in all our CountryLife stores.
Harvesting
  • Onion Sets are ready to harvest when foliage turns yellow and bulbs are exposed in the soil.
  • Pull onions from the soil and leave in the sun to dry for 7 - 10 days.
  • If wet weather occurs and you are unable to dry your onions in the sun, store your onions in a well ventilated room / shed on open racking to allow circulation of air.
  • Once the onions have dried sufficiently cut the roots and the stem, allowing 5cm for storage to prevent the bulb from rotting.
  • You can then hang your onions by tying the stems together or using an old pair of tights.
Growing Tips
  • Regular weeding is essential - because of the way their leaves are held upright, onions aren't good at suppressing weed growth and, if left for too long, weeds will soon swamp the crop and cause damaging competition.
  • Bolting, or running to flower, can be a common problem with onions, especially if there's a late cold spell or they suffer hot, dry conditions. Choosing heat-treated sets or late-maturing varieties will reduce the likelihood of bolting.
  • Stagger planting times to allow for a long harvest season and a constant supply of fresh vegetables.